Follow Him: Craig Stewart – Blackthorn Blog Tour

BLACKTHORN BOOK TOURS PRESENTS (1) (2).pngFirstly, thank you very much to Blackthorn for inviting me onto this book tour, and providing a free ebook of Follow Him. Today is my stop on the tour, and you should definitely check out the other bloggers to see what they’ve said about this novel, too.

Blurb

True love doesn’t die – it devours. Just outside the sleepy town of Dreury, a mysterious cult known as The Shared Heart has planted its stakes. Its followers are numerous. More join every day. Those who are lost and suffering seem to be drawn to it; a home for the broken. When Jacob finds himself in need of such a home, he abandons his dead name and gives himself over to the will of The Great Collector. However, love refuses to let Jacob go so easily; his ex-fiancé, Nina, kidnaps him in the hopes that he can be deprogrammed. As she attempts to return Jacob to the life they once had, a terrible fear creeps in: what if there isn’t enough of her Jacob left? When The Great Collector learns of his missing follower, the true nature of The Shared Heart is unleashed. Nina discovers what Jacob already knows: that hidden behind the warm songs and soaring bonfires is a terrifying and ancient secret; one that lives and breathes and hungers. And it’s coming for them.

Review

Follow Him is a dark, twisted novel with the sort of imagery that would be hard to shake off in a hurry. It’s told through different perspectives, mainly focusing on Jacob and Nina, a young couple, who have very contrasting views about The Shared Heart. After a slight breakdown of their relationship, Jacob seeks comfort in the cult and falls completely for what he’s told. Nina, desperate to locate her missing boyfriend, tracks him down, kidnaps him and takes him back home, where she discovers just how far she’s willing to go to keep him from the clutches of The Great Collector and The First.

And the beauty – and horror – in this book lies in discovery. In the discovery of what, exactly, The Great Collector has been doing to the cult members. In finding out why Jacob really left, and the slow revelations scattered throughout the book.

The gore is really amped up towards the end, as the Harvest approaches and the plans of The Shared Heart start to be revealed. This is not a novel for the faint of heart, with uncomfortable moments scattered throughout the book, and scenes that might just turn a reader’s stomach.

Characters

I don’t always have a section dedicated to characters in a review, but I wanted to have one here, because I feel it’s important. The two main characters of the novel are Jacob and Nina, and both conceal things from the reader and those around them. Nothing that feels forced when revealed, but information that deepens our understanding of both of them.

For Nina, we begin to understand her desperation in getting her boyfriend back, her close relationship with her brother, her fears about what is and isn’t out there, and it all combines to form a strong woman who may not always act in the best way, but who definitely has us, as readers, rooting for her, as she’s lured towards The Shared Heart but constantly pushes herself away from the cliffedge.

Jacob, on the other hand…

I started off rooting for Jacob, not necessarily wanting him to achieve what he wanted, but wanting to see him, in some way, succeed, anyway. That changed – Jacob is not the hero of the story, and by the mid-way point, I was almost wishing for his death. He’s just not a good guy, at all, as much as he pretends otherwise. He’s selfish, and cruel, even before he joined The Shared Heart.

But the way these two characters are put together, then apart, then opposite each other, it works really well, and carried me throughout the novel.

All in all, Follow Him is a twisted, creepy, gory novel, with plenty of tense and stomach-twisting moments, with a fantastic ending. Definitely gets a recommendation from me.

follow him

Author

Craig Stewart is a Canadian author and filmmaker who learned how to count from the rhyme, “One, two Freddy’s coming for you.” He’s a creator and connoisseur of everything horror; never afraid to delve into the dark. His first novel, Worship Me, received the New Apple Literary Award of Excellence for horror in 2018. He has also written and directed several short films that have enjoyed screenings across North America. He currently wanders dark hallways in Toronto, Canada.

Find out more about Blackthorn Book Tours 

A Heart So Fierce and Broken – Brigid Kemmerer [Book Review]

a heart soThe curse is broken. Harper has remained in Emberfall with her brother Jake and his boyfriend, Noah, and with Rhen. With no sign of Grey, rumours of another heir threatening to break the kingdom apart, added to the fact people believe the alliance with ‘Disi’ is a scam, something must be done.

Grey has killed the enchantress Lilith and returned to Emberfall, but with a secret he is unable to share with Rhen, he goes into hiding, taking on the name ‘Hawk’ and working at a tournament ground, staying as hidden as he possibly can.

Look, I’m going to be honest. I was completely and utterly revved up for this book. I don’t often pre-order books, but I did for this one, cause damn was I keen on returning to Emberfall.

Unfortunately, this is one of those sequels that makes you wish the original was a standalone.

I gave this 4*s on Goodreads because Kemmerer’s writing is, in all fairness, fantastic – it’s vivid and beautiful. And the last third of the book had me hooked, but before that…

Well it took a while to get into this one.

The book starts with Harper, then shifts into two POVs which take over for the novel – Grey and Lia Mara, the eldest daughter of Karis Luran but not the heir, that honour going to her sister, instead. And that’s where I felt like the book let me down first. Karis Luran enters Emberfall with her daughters, keen to marry off her heir to Rhen and forge an alliance with Emberfall.

For a lot of the book, I found Lia Mara to be overly whiny and woe-is-me. She’s not helpless, at all, but every other sentence was about how her sister is stronger and how her sister is going to be queen and how she doesn’t match up to her sister and mother. I think a lot of her, especially in earlier chapters, felt forced, too. Like there were moments that felt less relevant to the plot, and there only so we could have some slight reason to like her.

She had some strong moments, but these were overshadowed by the really annoying ones. And then there is Grey. Although I didn’t fully buy into the idea of a love triangle in A Curse So Dark and Lonely, it was evident here, and felt like there was going to be a bit of a build up between Harper and Grey. But nope, we’re quickly whisked away from Harper almost as soon as we get a tiny glimpse of her.

The romance between Grey and Lia Mara, again, felt a little forced. Grey remains one of my favourite characters, but so much of this book was him – and yep, again – whining. Following motions and never really doing much of anything until he was backed into a corner. I liked the way he did react to certain situations, as it’s clear he’s still very much a guardsman, and once more, a lot of the issues I found in the first half disappeared in the second.

Regarding Rhen and Harper now. In A Curse, I absolutely loved the three characters who formed the focus on the book. Harper was a strong, powerful woman who did not put up with anything untoward from either Grey or Rhen. Rhen was troubled and tortured and desperate to do anything to save his kingdom, and throughout the novel it really felt like he grew as a character.

We get none of that growth in this book, none of Harper’s fierceness. Every time we see her, she’s running to greet one of the men in her life or blushing under Grey’s praise. She basically lets Rhen torture people, she sits back while his kingdom is falling to pieces around him because he’s too stubborn to do really consider any option except kill. There are moments near the start of the book where Grey could have actually spoken to Rhen, but they all decide that nope, dying is the best option so let’s just get this over with!

Okay! Things I liked, because I did like a few things. I liked the relationship between Lia Mara and her sister. I liked the additional characters we meet in this novel, and the way the discord among the populace is shown. We also get to see more magic here, used in much better ways, and it works well.

This book isn’t as good as A Curse So Dark and Lonely, which felt more natural in terms of plot progression, character development and the choices made by the characters. Instead, we have two intelligent characters who go around in circles seeming to make life more difficult for themselves, making it feel like everything they do is in service to the plot rather than the world around them. The writing remains beautiful, and Kemmerer clearly has a way with words, but unfortunately the two main characters we follow in this book have less of an impact than both Harper and Rhen, two characters thrust aside for the sequel, whose presence could have made this book that much stronger.

Women in Horror Month

DHR_DeadHead_WIHM_InstaSCREAMQUEEN

February marks Women in Horror month, when the Horror Community raise up the voices of women in horror, celebrating everything they stand for, whether it’s the characters we remember kicking ass, the creators working behind the scenes, the women writers who create dark, twisted stories that drag you deeply in.

This is the first year I’ve actively participated in Women in Horror Month. I’ve always tried to pay attention to it, noting books others were reading, adding them to my ever growing wishlist. But this year, things are different.

See, in 2019, I became a contributor for Dead Head Reviews, and more recently became a copy editor for them, too. A few months back, I asked Patrick if we planning anything for Women in Horror. At that point, we decided we definitely should do something, and a small spark of an idea has flared into a full raging fire.

Throughout February, Dead Head will be featuring articles, reviews, interviews and stories, all focusing on and/or created by Women in Horror. As copy editor, I’ve had the great pleasure of reading many of these, and I can tell you, they are bloody fantastic. I also put together a ‘Love Letter to Horror’ article, featuring the Dead Head Ladies, and personally, I am so proud of how it’s turned out.

There are so many reasons why Women in Horror month is important. Women have long been creators and consumers of horror, yet historically have been overlooked in these roles. Horror is a constant presence in our lives, even in the media aimed at little girls. If you don’t think there are some dark as hell moments in Disney, you haven’t been paying close enough attention.

As we grow older, women from all walks of life face horror, in one form or another, in their every day lives. What woman doesn’t know the fear of walking down a street after sundown, and hearing footsteps behind them? Or the fear in a crowded bar, when a man starts talking to them and sometimes follows them back to their table, or outside, or are even waiting at the toilet door when they emerge. (Yes, that happened to me!)

Is it any wonder that even when they’re not creating Horror, women are often the focus?

Being a woman is dangerous. Danger and fear and horror are all part of it, and that’s without going deeper into the statistics and realities.

One thing, above all others, stands out to me as I read the articles appearing on Dead Head next month.  Women may live their lives in fear, but they take that, grabbing hold of the horror inflicted upon them, and they use it. They – we – turn it into a strength. The darkest parts of our lives are used to create amazing horror. The worst things we can imagine are brought to life, and through horror we find acceptance, and strength, and power.

Every single man I personally know in the horror community has been nothing but supportive regarding Women in Horror Month. Everyone – man and woman – has really come together, determined to make this month successful for all of us.

And I dare you to get through February without your TBR growing.

So, this February, check out Dead Head Reviews and the other horror sites. Read the articles and interviews and reviews, and read some work by amazing women in horror. Join us for the ride, cause I guarantee, it’s going to be a bloody good one.

DHR_WomenInHorrorMonth_FINALADJUSTMENTGraphics by the amazing, super talented @ImaginariumCS.

Dead Head Reviews

Twitter & Instagram: @ReviewsHead

Slay My Love – Lee Colgin [Book Review]

slay my love.jpg

He couldn’t possibly be this lonely forever

It’s been a while since I read something that could be classed as Paranormal Romance, and Slay My Love was a great way to dip my toes back into the genre.

The new vampire in town is different than any the hunters have seen before, and Franklin is sent to investigate, on behalf of The Scourge. Gianni, a born vampire, realises he’s being followed, and rather than attack the hunter, he talks to him. So begins an unlikely friendship between enemies, forming the basis for a smouldering attraction between the two.

A lot of the paranormal stuff I’ve read in the past, even stuff that focuses on vampires, tended to introduce other creatures into the mix, especially werewolves/shifters and the like. Having the focus on just vampires in Slay My Love works really well, keeping the reader focused on these two characters. And they are great characters to read about, the duel POV used to good effect.

Although we get glimpses into both character’s heads, the tension is effective, some information held back, the writing cutting away from one character when it feels like we’re about to learn something we maybe shouldn’t. The writing itself ensures the reader never feels cheated by this, but more that we really are listening to two men, each with their own agenda, each battling their own inner demons as well as external ones, and each lying not just to each other, but to themselves.

The relationship between the two developed really well, and had me really hoping they would overcome any obstacles and remain together, despite the problems standing in their way. Gianni and Franklin were really enjoyable characters to read about, and their voices carried the story very well.

Colgin creates characters who are intriguing, broken, and lonely, and who manage to find comfort in each other, despite their differences. The story flowed well, the tension worked to keep me reading, and the action involved was gripping. Overall, if you’re a fan of paranormal romance, I really do recommend Slay My Love.

 

Children of Virtue and Vengeance – Tomi Adeyemi [Book Review]

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The second in the Legacy of Orïsha series, Children of Virtue and Vengeance continues the story of Zélie and Amari, who, together, have brought magic back to Orïsha. Although the maji have regained their powers, nobles with magical ancestry now find themselves able to use magic as well, presenting even more dangers for the two young women.

The maji are still hunted, but can now fight back. And Zélie knows the best chance her people have of a safe, peaceful future is with Amari on the throne. But getting her there will be difficult, especially when both find themselves hunted by the remaining nobility.

I really liked Children of Blood and Bone, the first in this series, but Children of Virtue and Vengeance shows how much Adeyemi has already improved as a writer, even in the short time between the release of her debut and the sequel.

The writing is stronger, and in some ways, even the characters feel more realised. THe multi-POV worked that little bit better in this book, as Zélie and Amari no longer have a single goal uniting them. Throughout, a distance grows between them, and though both want to close it, neither seems able to do so.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story. I liked the wider scope of it, the introduction of more maji and information about them, about how they worked together before The Raid and how their history unfolded. I liked the different relationships that emerged through this, and the way both Zélie and Amari are portrayed. Neither are the same as when we first met them, and it’s clear how recent events have affected them both, as well as the events contained in the novel.

The ending packs a strong punch too, leaving the reader desperately eager for the next installment to find out what happens next.

There is a lot more I’d like to say about this, but I feel saying much more risks introducing spoilers into this post, and this book is one that definitely has some nice surprises you don’t want spoiled.

If you liked Children of Blood and Bone, definitely check out this continuation. I cannot wait for book #3.

The Testaments – Margaret Atwood

the testamentsThe Testaments is the sequel to Atwood’s outstanding novel. The Handmaid’s Tale, and takes us further into Gilead, allowing us to see more of the messed up, dystopian world ruled by the Sons of Jacob.

While The Handmaid’s Tale was told through one POV (Offred), The Testaments is told through three – Aunt Lydia, who expands on the treatment of women in the early days of the regime, Agnes Jemima, a young girl growing up in Gilead, and Daisy, a teenager in Canada.

Aunt Lydia’s sections read most like The Handmaid’s Tale, as she records her diary and hides it from prying eyes, giving the reader an insight into the function of the Aunts, and how they came to be in their position.

In contrast, Agnes’ and Daisy’s chapters read much more like a YA novel, presented as ‘witness statements’ as the girls reveal how they came to be in their current situations. The chapters switch back and forth, painting deeper pictures of what growing up in Gilead is like, and how the rest of the world views the situation.

One thing that struck me when I read The Handmaid’s Tale last year was how, after all this time, it’s still so scaringly relevant. With The Testaments, Atwood doesn’t shy away from current issues. Countries are too scared to step in and deal with Gilead, preferring to watch from afar as Gilead puts out its own propaganda, meant, at times, to make places like Canada feel better about doing nothing. Fleeing refugees are dealt with poorly, with some people resenting their presence. And children protest against Gilead, while others raised there see no wrong in the way they are brought up.

The contrast between the two girls works really well, especially when we get glimpses of Agnes’ school life, and her best friends. Gilead is very much a patriarchal (in the strongest sense) and classist society, Agnes’ classmates treatment of her affected by how many Marthas she has, by the fact her father gets a handmaid, and so on. Although things do not sit quite right with her, she accepts them, only acting to change things once she receives permission.

In contrast, Daisy is strong-willed and stubborn, keen to make her voice heard, though at most times she comes across as apathetic, almost like a mask to conceal what she actually feels.

The characters in The Testaments feel as real and vivid as Offred, from Aunt Lydia’s recollections of how Gilead started, to the words of the two girls who have never known a world without Gilead. Despite her sheltered upbringing, Agnes does have empathy for people around her. Lydia quietly works to maintain her place, and Daisy searches for answers once it becomes clear her parents haven’t always told her the truth.

At times, it becomes easy to dislike some of the characters, but questions are raised regarding whether you would take the same course of action, or do something differently. Whether it is worth risking your life for the innocents around you, or risk the life of people you love for the greater good.

The Testaments isn’t as good as The Handmaid’s Tale, and it is, in many ways, an easier read, feeling a little bit more removed, more with a dystopian YA feel than The Handmaid’s Tale, but it is still powerful in its own way, and still carries the threat of Gilead, showing how easy it would be for a regime such as that to take over, and for many to ignore the suffering happening right before their eyes.

Blogmas #11: Christmas Songs

blogmas 11

I love Christmas songs, I love listening to old favourites as well as hearing new ones, and listening to new takes on old classics. As soon as it’s socially acceptable, I put on Christmas music and listen to some great songs when I can – when writing and in the shower, mostly. Below are some of my current favourites for this year, and I’ve tried to mix it up as much as I could, rather than just include the standard set of Christmas songs we all know and love.

Fair warning: quite a lot of these are Disney, because Disney Christmas music is awesome.

Christmas is Here – Disneyland Paris Christmas Parade

 

I love this song so much. It’s catchy, and joyful, and just conveys exactly what Christmas should be about. I’m so glad we got to experience it this year, even if we watched the parade while queuing for Stitch, but it’s the last year they’re using it, apparently. Still, it’ll likely be one I listen to every year from now on.

Twelve Days of Christmas – Straight No Chaser

I absolutely love this version of Twelve Days, which I actually only heard for the fast time last year. It’s now an absolute must at Christmas – fun and original, and the kind of song you can entertain family members with when they hear it for the first time.

I Believe In Father Christmas – Greg Lake

 

I couldn’t do a list of Christmas songs and not include this. Did anyone else listen to this as a kid and, like, NOT pick up on the actual meaning? It’s my dad’s favourite Christmas song, so whenever it came on – on the radio, originally, then on TV when we got music channels – it gets turned way up, and anyone currently in the household sings along. I love this song – it’s one of those that sounds really happy and cheerful, until you actually, properly listen to it.

It Feels Like Christmas – Muppets Christmas Carol

 

To pick just one song from the whole film was a struggle – if you haven’t already, I definitely suggest listening to the complete soundtrack over the festive period. Muppets Christmas Carol is not only the best version of Christmas Carol, but the best Christmas film, period. It’s fantastic and heart-warming and with some amazing songs. Can’t go wrong with this one at all, and it’s a real shame I don’t have time now for a Christmas Films blog because this would have definitely been on there.

As Long As There’s Christmas – Beauty & The Beast: Enchanted Christmas

 

I really need to watch this filma gain. And I warned you there’d be a lot of Disney. This song is from the sequel to Beauty and the Beast, a film I really should watch again. Like Christmas is Here, it’s just a joyful song, and it’s less about all the extra stuff around Christmas, and more about making do with what you have around you, because it’s not the tree that makes Christmas, is it? It’s the people you spend it with, the memories you make, the magic feel in the air. The sneaking around behind a cursed beast’s back and – oh, wait, that’s kind of specific, isn’t it?

 

This will actually be my last Blogmas post, as I am going to Margate tomorrow to spend Christmas with my brother. I hope you’ve enjoyed these Christmas themed blog posts, and I would love to hear your thoughts on the songs I’ve picked, and if you have any particular Christmas song favourites, especially if they’re not the usual ones we often hear!

To all my followers –

Merry Christmas!

Whatever you do over the next week, I hope you have an absolutely lovely time, doing what you enjoy best, whatever that may be, and spending it with the people you want to spend it with. Have a good one!

Blogmas #8: End of Year Book Tag

Blogmas #8Again, big thanks to Jenn, for pointing me in the direction of her Blogmas list. One of the suggestions there was for an End of Year Book Tag, and you can read her post here.

If you read my previous tag post, you’ll know I don’t often do book tag things, but I did enjoy it, so maybe I shall do more in 2020. We shall see.

1. Are there any books you started this year you need to finish?

the testamentsSo far, just The Testaments and Cricket Hunters. I don’t tend to pick up then put down books for extended periods of time, unless it’s something really harrowing I can’t read straight through and need short gaps from. There are more books I’d like to read before the end of the year, but none I’ve actually started reading.

2. Do you have an autumnal book to transition to the end of the year?

I don’t get books for specific seasons, but if I get a book and it fits a specific season (such as my recently reviewed Season of Wonder) I will try and wait to read it. But right now, I don’t have anything like that on my TBR.

3. Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

To be honest, so many great books come out so often, I don’t really keep track of new releases, or separate them from my other books. And if it’s a book I really do want, I’ll usually find an excuse to pick it up.

4. What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

I maybe should have tried to do this earlier in the month. I’m not sure if I’m going to get acreature chance to read three books before the end of the year, but we shall see. If I can, I would love to read Ritual – Steve Stred, Creature – Hunter Shea, and other than that, I’m not quite sure. Depends how much reading I get done in the next week. If you saw my December TBR post, you’ll know I was planning on reading The Dragon Republic, but it’s so big I can’t really take it away with me Monday, so this will probably get left until the New Year now.

5. Is there a book that you think could still shock you and become your favourite?

Considering the amount of good things I’ve heard about it, it’s possible this happens with Creature.

6. Have you already made reading plans for 2020?

Not really, mainly because I don’t like to plan out what I’mm going to read and when, because I would really struggle to stick to it. That said, I am hoping to clear most of my now backlog of review books, and maybe possibly join Netgalley, if I have the time. We shall see. Other than that, more of the same, though with the way this year ended, I’ll be reading a lot more horror next year than this year. Which is definitely not a bad thing.

25-Post-Ideas-for-BlogmasBlogmas #1 – Christmas TBRBlogmas #2: The Most Wonderful Time of the YearBlogmas #3: Christmas ReadsBlogmas #4: Bookish Naughty or Nice ListBlogmas #6: 2019 Wrap Up & 2020 GoalsBlogmas #7: Favourite 2019 Books Part 1Blogmas #7: Favourite 2019 Books Part 2

Season of Wonder – Edited by Paula Guran

season of wonderSeason of Wonder is a winter holiday themed anthology, bringing together fantasy and science fiction stories centred around the darkest months. Christmas isn’t the only holiday contained in these stories, but it is the most prominent. Still, as a whole, I think this is a great festive read.

The stories vary enough to give a little something for everyone, with a mixture of science fiction, fantasy, and even some horror elements thrown in. There’s robots caring for the last man on Earth, a post-apocalypse society ruled by religion, a young boy who stands against an evil elf, a young woman who gets caught in the battle between the Holly and Oak king, a woman on a distant planet introduces the inhabitants to Christmas, and a story of mental health, a woman who believes in magic, told through the eyes of her best friend.

The absolute stand out story for me was The Christmas Witch, a story which uses horror and fantasy to do one of my favourite things those genres are capable of; drawing parallels to very real situations, and reflecting issues often faced, especially by younger people. In this story, a young girl grieves the death of her mother, and lashes out in her own way, but the adults all seem to turn a blind eye. Her father tries to help, but not in the best way, and no one actually listens to her. It’s a fantastic read, and one hard to forget.

Pal Of Mine was also particularly good, one of those stories where the fantastical element is in doubt, right until the very end. It was wonderfully written, and very bittersweet.

Home for Christmas is a very sweet story, about a young woman who can talk to objects. It’s wonderfully written, draws you right in with the MC and her unusual ability, and shows how even small acts of kindness can have a lasting impact.

Others I particularly enjoyed, and would have liked to have read more about their worlds, were The Night Things Changed and The Nutcracker Coup. Both wonderful tales with fantastic world building, especially for short stories.

Everytime I think I’ve listed the ones I really liked, more pop into my head. Okay, last one, I swear. Newsletter, the final story in the anthology, is another great read – it’s witty and engaging and had me laughing out loud at the last line. And it’s a really interesting way of telling the story, combined with an uncertainty at the end, leaving the reader with multiple questions, and no answers except for whatever they decide in their head.

I really do recommend this collection. It has interesting portrayals of Christmas and the various aspects associated with the holiday, with more than one take on Santa Claus and the legend of. It was an enjoyable, fun, sometimes downright dark collection, with stories to both warm your heart on these cold winter evenings, and make you snuggle under the covers, glad you’re safe in your bed.

Blogmas #7: Favourite 2019 Books Part 2

Blogmas #7Welcome to the second part of my favourite books of 2019! As explained in Part One, these aren’t books published this year, but books I’ve read this year, with one book picked from each month, and a note of other books I read that month so you can see what it was stacked up against. There will also be links to my reviews, so if any catch your eye, go check them out. As this is July – December, there will also be links to my reviews over at Dead Head Reviews, which if you’re a horror fan, is definitely a website you need to check out.

And onto part two! Enjoy.

July

spin the dawnSpin the Dawn – Elizabeth Lim

My Review

I only read three books this month, but the choice was really difficult, as I read both Spin the Dawn and Circe in July. In the end, I decided to go for Elizabeth Lim’s debut novel, a retelling of Mulan that weaves in some fantastic elements and beautiful imagery, and just absolutely swept me off my feet. This book is fantastic, and I really can’t wait for the sequel. Definitely check it out if you haven’t already.

Also Read This Month: Circe, Hysteria: The Biography

August

nos4r2.jpgNOS4R2 – Joe Hill

My Review

This is the month where I started reviewing for Dead Head Reviews, and therefore read a lot of horror. But NOS4R2 deserves a mention, because it’s a downright creepy, eerie read, with a creepy antagonist obsessed with Christmas, and a young woman desperately trying to understand her own abilities. It’s almost like X-Men meets Stephen King. That car, the Christmas songs, the way the protagonist questions her own mind and no one around actually believes her, it all adds up to a brilliant, if hefty, read.

Also Read This Month: Rose, The Blade Itself, The Deal Maker, Kakorrhaphiophobia

September

black rainbow.jpgBlack Rainbow – Edited By Scott Savino

My Review

This was a very difficult month, and my choice really came down to this, Midnight in the Graveyard, and Grind Your Bones to Dust, but Black Rainbow was pure gold. An LGBT horror anthology, the stories contained within it are unique and fresh, bringing new voices to the horror genre and giving us some excellent stories. Check it out – you really won’t be disappointed.

Also Read This Month: Carmilla, Mr Deadman Made Me Do It, Dangerous Women Part 1, Grind Your Bones to Dust, The Town That Feared Dusk, Fevre Dream, Midnight in the Graveyard

October

whispersWhispers in the Dark – Laurel Hightower

My Review

Another tough month. Basically, since I started reviewing for Dead Head Reviews, I’ve read some amazing horror novels, but Whispers in the Dark is one of my favourites I’ve read this year, let alone in just October. It’s a fantastic, gripping, haunting read, and I’m keen to see what Laurel Hightower gives readers next.

Also Read This Month: A Parallel Abyss, The Tunnellers, Under My Hat, In the Scrape

November

a curse so darkA Curse So Dark and Lonely – Brigid Kemmerer

My Review

This was the hardest month yet, as somehow I managed to read nine books. Considering I didn’t read for a few days as I was away, I’m kind of amazed at myself. But not only was it nine books read, the majority of them were really, really good. Still, I’m going to put this at the top of my favourites for this month. Just something about this Beauty and the Beast retelling really captivated me, and it helped me heal after finishing Queen of Nothing. A fantastic book, and I can’t wait for the sequel.

Also Read This Month: The Devil’s Apprentice, The Sea Was a Fair Master, A World of Horror, Esme’s Wish, Let It Go, Dear Laura, The Queen of Nothing, Various States of Decay

December

TBD

I’ve only finished two books this month so far, so I won’t make any decisions on December yet. Expect an update post from me later in the month!

 

So there we have it! Twelve favourites across two posts. And you really can tell when I started reviewing for Dead Head Reviews, can’t you? For reading, it’s been a really good year for me so far, with some fantastic books, new-to-me authors, a few old favourites and some debuts that absolutely blew me away. Let’s hope this trend of reading great books continues into 2020!