Unwrapping Words

A glimpse into the world of a girl who enjoys reading, writing and video games.

Feel The Anger

Wrath Front Cover with text.jpgFear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.

We all know Yoda’s famous quote, even if you’ve never seen Star Wars. Anger is a dangerous, tricky beast, uncontrollable once unleashed, and if allowed to roam for too long, devastating for any involved.

Each of the seven deadly sins would make an interesting topic to explore in writing, which is why the Seven Deadly Sins YA anthology is such a great idea. So far, they have 5 volumes out, covering Pride, Sloth, Envy, Gluttony and now, Wrath. And, lucky me, I’m one of the writers in the volume dedicated to Wrath.

I’m very, very honoured to be included in the anthology with my story Dying of the Light, alongside some very talented writers. This marks my first in-print publication, and I’ve already ordered my copy so I can hold it in my hands and squeal at seeing my name on the front cover.

Proceeds from the anthology go to First Book, which makes me even more happy to be a part of this.

I’ve had the pleasure of reading a few of these stories already, and cannot wait to settle down with my copy and read them all.

Dying of the Light

Eliza and Chloe were born into a culture that relished powers. As twins, one was destined to be stronger, and with that strength came the possibility of uncontrolled rage. When others sought to steal the strong twins’ power, they chose the wrong girl. After Chloe’s funeral, Eliza makes her way to the place where her sister died, determined to find those responsible and enact her revenge.

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SDS Wrath–Meet the Authors, Day 3

This is exciting!

standard ishue--Katie

Imagine this: Combine a roller coaster of teenage emotions—those volatile, hard to control passions—with frustration and anger. Can you visualize it? Or perhaps you remember your own younger days, as you pushed through those sensations and into adulthood.

Scary? It can be when the theme is Wrath.

It’s my pleasure to introduce you to our final seven authors and their stories! If any of their blurbs catch your eye, consider posting a review on Amazon or Goodreads. The anthology will be released on August 8, 2017!

 

A Lion’s Wrath by M. Polo

Justin has been seeing the same therapist for three years and there are few things he hates more than their weekly sessions together. He usually feels powerless and at the mercy of his psychiatrist, but today is different. Empowered by new information, Justin feels ready to take on Dr. Winters and make sure he never has to…

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How Not To Introduce Characters

girl and tree.jpg

Readers and writers, I think, all have their own little pet peeves when it comes to something they read. For the most part, these all come down to personal taste. Some readers might dislike reading something involving the supernatural. Personally, I really don’t like ‘direct thoughts’ unless they are handled extremely well. Otherwise, they feel jarring and too much telling, rather than showing.

Another thing that tends to annoy me involves, more specifically, the introduction of characters.

Introducing characters can be hard. You want readers to feel a certain way towards them, but don’t want to drone on and on. There’s a point when it becomes boring to read lengthy descriptions about their clothes and the way they enter a room. Actually, when it comes to clothes, I don’t always think it’s necessary, unless it says something particular about a character. But it’s not clothes here I’m talking about. The thing that really, really gets me, is when a character waltzes into a story and we’re told, outright, every little detail about their personality.

So, in a third person narrative with a main character, say the girl in the photo above, we might have the following –

“Jenny, a beautiful girl, was sad. She wore a white dress, and a crown made of twigs. She sat under the tree. Jenny was usually a happy, kind girl, with hopes and dreams. She loved hard. Now, the sadness was so overwhelming she didn’t feel as if she could go on. Jenny had been due to get married, but her handsome, wonderful finance, Robert, had run off with a bridesmaid.”

Bit boring, isn’t it? We’re told a lot about her, but that’s the problem. We’re told. Every writer knows the old ‘show, don’t tell’ rule, and though there are instances where this can be broken, usually it’s still better to stick to it, for the most part. Plus, when we’re told something – especially positive things, like they’re gorgeous, or kind, or plain wonderful – it sometimes makes it harder to believe. We need to see things. Plus, being shown something means, if they act against that description later, we’re not rolling our eyes, wondering, well, we were told she was kind, so why is she now acting like that? Show us her kindness, because it then leaves room for her to be not-so-kind in another situation.

So, the above could be changed to –

“Jenny reached the tree where she’d shared her first kiss with Robert. The crown, formed of twigs, circled her dark hair, and dug into her skin. She sank to the ground, drew her knees to her chest, and rested her head on them, allowing the tears to fall. Everything she’d wanted from that day was now ruined. Her bridesmaid, who’d she’d babysat for, who she’d helped out when her own husband left her, had betrayed her. The thought brought a deep, aching pang to her chest. How could she possibly go on?”

Still not perfect, but it is just an example. It gives the same information as above, but, hopefully, in a much more engaging way. Showing, rather than telling.

Keep in mind, the words of a great man: “Any man who must say I am the king, is no true king.” Similarly, if you need to state your character’s traits, it makes the reader doubt if they actually have them. I’ve always taken that quote to mean that actions speak louder than words. You show people who you are by what you do, not by saying ‘I am…’. So give your characters the chance to do the same.

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What about you? As readers or writers, what are the things that particularly annoy you when reading?

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It’s Okay To Take A Break

One thing that’s hammered into writers, over and over, is ‘write every day.’ The idea being that the only way you’re going to get better is to produce words every day, whether it’s 100, 500, 1000 or more. We’re told, as writers, that it doesn’t matter what you write, even if it’s completely rubbish, because you can always go back and edit. This is true – first drafts are rarely going to be shining gems. But in regards to writing every day, it’s one piece of advice that can be thrown out the window.

If it does work for you, great! Keep doing it. Honestly, I prefer write when you can, when you want to. Whether that’s one day a week, or every day for a few weeks with breaks in-between. To be honest, convincing myself I had to write every day has caused me more guilt than anything else. The days when I don’t write, I used to question myself on whether it meant my writing wasn’t as good, or I wasn’t as much a writer as other people, etc. I used to beat myself up over it.

Truth is, sometimes when I get home, I can barely focus. Words on screens start to swim after a day of, well, looking at words on screens. And I know, if I were to write then, it just wouldn’t be good. I wouldn’t enjoy it, I’d struggle, and get annoyed. And honestly, what’s the point of writing if you’re not enjoying it? Normally, I do. Enjoy it, I mean. But I can’t just sit and write when I don’t feel like it.

Every so often, I come home from work, and just play video games. This might be for a day or two, or a whole week. Usually only a week if I know I’ll have plenty of writing time coming up. And on the weekends, I’m with my boyfriend; we don’t live together, so it’s the only time we get to spend decent amounts of time together. We play games, we watch things – I don’t write. And you know what? That’s okay.

It’s okay to take a break now and then. To be a writer – even a good one – you don’t have to write every day, when you least feel like it. It took me a while to realise that and to stop beating myself up for not slaving over the keyboard for another few hours in the evenings, or to not feel guilty for enjoying time with my boyfriend rather than locking down into what is, essentially, a solitary activity. Besides that, as writers we still need things outside of writing; it can’t become our whole lives, otherwise, what would we write about?

So, if you take occasional days off from writing, for whatever reason, just know it’s okay. It’s not the end of the world, and those characters will still be waiting for you when you come back. A little break never harmed anyone. You don’t have to write every day; just write whenever you feel best to do so.

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Why I Write

First things first; I know, I know, it’s been….actually, over a year since I posted. I’m terrible, awful, should have updated more…I’m just not hugely good at keeping up with things. But I promise, I will endeavour to write more on this blog, not least because now I have something to actually update people with! More on that a little later.

Recently, I’ve had a little crisis of confidence when it comes to my writing. This happens from time to time, when I begin to wonder if this is something I actually am good at, or if I’m just wasting my time bashing words onto a keyboard that no one but me will ever read.

I write for the love of it. Because it is one of those things I think (sometimes) I am pretty good at. I’ve always had good feedback on my work, whether it was on FictionPress, in seminars at University, or on Scrib. Well, less on Scribophile but for the most part, the critiques are still encouraging – just more geared towards improvement than anything else. And without it, I really don’t think my stories would have improved as much as they have in the last year or so I’ve been on there.

I’m not looking for fame and glory, though I’d be lying if I said it wouldn’t be a nice bonus. Eventually, it would be amazing just to have an audience, even if it was just one person, and to know I’d made someone smile through my writing – whether a short story or novel – or wrote something they thought of days later, in the same way some stories cross my own mind.

Isn’t that what all writers want?

Even without that though, there are other reasons I persist.

Truth be told, before the last year or so, things haven’t exactly been easy. There have been ups and downs, and through the downs, through some of the worst moments of my life, writing has been a persistent and constant companion. I have used it to work through my own thoughts, or to draw myself into a completely different world where the things I’ve been dealing with don’t exist. I’ve also used my own experiences to give my characters, hopefully, depth; in some, they have some of the less well-known symptoms of depression, or find themselves at some sort of crossroads, where they take the path I, personally, didn’t.

I’ve always used writing in this way, pouring my thoughts onto paper in the guise of fiction. And it helps. Whether or not what I’m writing relates to what I’m experiencing at the time, focusing on the words stops me focusing on whatever is bothering me. And if I go too long without working on anything, I start to feel drained, my fingers itching to get something written, no matter what it is.

Things have been a lot better more recently. For a variety of different reasons. But still, I write. I write because I can’t not write. I write because when I don’t, ideas and characters crowd my head begging to be let out. I write because, well, I’m a writer. I kind of have to.

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The Value of Feedback

Every writer knows (or should know) the worth of feedback. Yes, we can pass our stories to friends and relatives but unless they have an eye for details the most one could expect is “I like it” or “Wasn’t fussed”, and some of them will say it’s great just to spare our feelings.

As writers, what we really need is good, constructive feedback. It’s great a story works but we need to know why. Similarly, a pair of objective eyes can go a long way in pinpointing what’s wrong, what doesn’t work, awkward sentences or grammatical errors we may have just missed.

I used to be a fairly active member of FictionPress. For those who don’t know, FictionPress was the sister site of FanFiction.org. I actually joined both in the early 2000s; FanFiction once I discovered I could write about Harry Potter, and shortly after, FictionPress when it started. Then I stopped, for a while, but while at University (possibly a little earlier) I rejoined the website and started posting more, as well as participating in The Roadhouse forum, where you could exchange reviews.

This worked out really well. I got to read some really good stories posted by other writers, and received a lot of great feedback on my work. Encouraging feedback, too, and through the reviews managed to realise exactly what I was doing wrong, and learned a few things about grammar that I hadn’t actually known before.

At University, studying Creative Writing, seminars were made up mostly of reading and critiquing people’s work. It was more important to be honest, and to be specific; to help pinpoint exactly what was right and wrong with another student’s story. And, under the right tutors, we were encouraged to experiment and try different techniques, styles, and to be completely honest in what we told others.

It’s something I’ve really missed since leaving University. I stopped posting on FictionPress when I realized I wanted to try to get my work out there. So there was no source for that sort of feedback. And it isn’t just on a spelling, grammar, etc level where the feedback is valuable.

It’s a confidence thing, too. Entering competitions and entering stories for possible publication, I constantly found myself wondering – is this good enough? Even with stories I really like, I still get that tremor of fear. But, with places like FictionPress and in a seminar, even when the feedback contains points to improve on, people will still tell you the things they liked about the story.

So, knowing I needed some way of getting feedback on what I’ve been writing, I joined Scribophile. I’ve only been on there a week, giving critiques, and so far have two stories posted up. The first has  had some really good critiques on it, which will go a long way to polishing it and making it much better than it currently is. I’m still waiting to get a few more on the second, but the other writers on the site have shown themselves to be kind, welcoming and eager to help everyone. The forums are entertaining, and the site has some brilliant articles in regards to writing. Overall, so far I’m enjoying the experience, and it’s given me exactly what I need. A place to get good, honest feedback, to help me grow as a writer and to give me that little boost of confidence I’m going to need going forward.

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Play Time

One thing writers are told time and time again is to read everything they can get their hands on. You cannot be a writer unless you’re a reader; otherwise, how do you know what’s gone before? Plus, reading books allows you to see how sentences are crafted and with a keen eye you can see how a writer has enabled you to feel for a character or, in some cases, to see where they have fallen down flat with this.

But it’s not just in books where aspiring writers can pick up tips. Film and TV, obviously, are brilliant showcases for dialogue, and looking at the way directors frame camera shots and build on relationships between characters can always provide inspiration for tricky scenes. But there’s a further medium that can be looked at, too – video games.

I mentioned before about my love for Bioshock and part of that love comes from the way it’s written. There are twists that are built up throughout the game, great moments of dialogue, and the way it’s written means that, as the main character, by a certain point you’re never quite sure who to trust. And then, of course, there is the ending, which quite honestly had me tearing up. (Well, the ending I saw. There are different endings depending on your actions in game)

Since I finished that game I’ve been playing Fallout 3. Bioshock is a more linear game, where you basically move from one part to the next. Fallout is different, in that you can pretty much explore the world around you at your leisure. You can follow the main story quests, or do lots of little side quests or a mix of both…it’s up to you.

Even with this freedom, story and plot still play a major role. On top of that, the writing – especially with dialogue for so many different characters – has to take into account the potential actions of the person playing. Yes, the enemies have stock lines that get thrown at you as you fight them, but if you listen Galaxy News Radio with Three Dog (a DJ who doesn’t know what a disc is) you’ll hear him mention various places and events and, later, even hear him reporting on what your character has been doing.

The actual plot revolves around your character going out looking for his/her father, and in terms of writing, the game is very good at giving hints as to what your father might be doing, via Three Dog. And there’s a karma system to it, too. You can save certain characters or help them out, giving you karma, or…do other stuff and get negative karma. I assume. I very much help people in the game where I can. And of course, there is one character I care about more than any other, who I just want to be happy even if he keeps running away from me. Just hope he turns up at Vault 101 again soon.

images (1).jpgOne of the other games I’ve been playing is Kingdom Hearts 1.5  – the remake of the PS2 game by the same name, but this version is apparently HD or something and has two of the other games included. I’ve been focusing on replaying the main game; I know when I played years ago I got to the end, but I don’t quite remember if I actually managed to beat the final boss or not.

Kingdom Hearts is a game using characters from Final Fantasy and various Disney films. You play Sora, a FF-style kid who just wants to leave the island he lives on with his two best friends. But when a storm strikes, the friends are separated and Sora wakes up in a very strange town. He meets Goofy and Donald, on a quest to find King Mickey, and joins them hoping they can help him find his friends.

With these two familiar faces, Sora travels through various worlds including Wonderland, Agrabah, the jungle Tarzan calls his home, Ancient Greece, and many others. As for plot, it’s a fairly simple one to follow, but one which does really well in drawing in these characters and having them inhabit the same universe, as the villains gather together to try to take over the world, using the heartless to achieve their goals.

Plot wise, it has some good examples perhaps of how to take existing stories and merge them together or rework them to fit something else. And what with it being a kid’s game, although it is single player there’s a strong message of working together and the importance of friendship. Something to keep in mind if, as a writer, you’re working on writing for kids.

kh That’s only two of the many, many games out there with compelling plots and interesting characters, mainly because it just happens to be the two I’m mainly playing at the moment. There are so many others out there, and I’ll probably come back to this in a future blog post, maybe one about the sort of games I played when I was younger. But if there are any games you’d recommend, or think contain some good tips for writing, let me know in the comments.

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In Defence of GRRM

With the new season fast approaching, news is leaking out all the time about Game of Thrones, with hints thrown at fans as to what direction this season might take. The last season already diverted from the books, and with characters cut out or merged, and story lines completely dropped, it’s safe to say that the TV show has, for a while, been heading somewhere different from the books. Yet despite this, with almost every new piece that comes out, someone will berate the author of the popular A Song of Ice & Fire series for still not finishing the next book.

A lot of people refer to prolific author Stephen King when arguing that it cannot be that hard to produce a novel regularly for the fans. And yes, King does come out with novels at a fast rate. As a King fan I can’t keep up, but among the books that come out are short stories and novellas, not just full length novels. And not everyone writes like King does, not everyone can produce work that fast. And, secondly, let’s not forget that it took over twenty years for him to complete his Dark Tower series. The first book came out in 1982, the last book in 2004 and a further novel in 2012. In contrast, A Song of Ice & Fire had its first book in 1996 and the fifth book in 2011. Yes, the latter is going to take longer but King only returned to Roland and his ka-tet after a pretty bad car accident.

Furthermore, although there were many people writing to King asking him to complete the series, it wasn’t on the same global mainstream scale as GRRM is now facing. Personally, I can’t imagine how much pressure he must be under to get the next book done. But that pressure, the knowledge that so many people are now waiting for it, is probably going to filter in and cause the dreaded writer’s block. And it’s not like he hasn’t done anything.

GRRM has been working on other stuff, other stories, working on the show, etc. And people complain about that, about getting short stories or spin offs or whatever and not the real thing. Problem is, and I’ve felt this myself with novels that are yet to see the light of day, sometimes you get stuck. Sometimes the characters just refuse to budge from a certain situation and the only way to get around it so you know you can come back with a clear idea is to work on something else.

Maybe it’s just me. Maybe he has been procrastinating and putting it off and to be honest, I’ll be cheering along with everyone else once the book is finally released and I can actually read it but, if I’m honest, I’d rather him take his time and deliver something decent rather than give us something not that good just to get people to shut up.

And in the meantime…there are literally thousands more books out there I want to read, and some of them include GRRM’s older works too (so far I’ve read the Wild Cards anthology, his Dreamsongs collection but just volume 1, Windhaven, and a couple of the Egg & Duck graphic novels…) so it’s not like I, or anyone else for that matter, is sitting at home twiddling their thumbs with absolutely nothing to read until the next book comes out.

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Taking Inspiration

Over Easter weekend I went to Margate to visit my brother and his girlfriend with my dad. Basically, it’s a journey directly east across the country, mainly on the motorways. On the way there I fell asleep before we left Cardiff, and woke up near Reading. On the way back, I fell asleep for about an hour. Most of the rest of the time was spent reading; there’s not a lot to really look at on that journey.

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We arrived on Good Friday. Went out in Margate in the evening and by Saturday I realized I desperately needed a notebook. Not that I was planning on doing some serious writing, just something to jot things down in. Despite having countless notebooks at home, I’d forgotten to throw one in my bag when we left. (The perils of packing while hungover last minute because of a decision to go for ‘one or two’ drinks the night before)

Luckily for me, we were going on a day trip to Canterbury. There were two things I wanted that I thought I would easily be able to get hold of; a nice notebook, and a copy of Canterbury Tales.

As it turned out, I was wrong.

I didn’t get either in Canterbury, though I did fall in love with the place. It’s a beautiful city with a lot of history behind it, and it was just a shame we couldn’t spend more time there to look into the museums or the cathedral. But I did pick up a couple of books at an awesome charity bookshop, had lunch in a lovely pub, and got really, really freaked out by something I saw there.

By the way, I don’t like dolls. Or dummies. They scare me. And what I saw involved dolls, and it was…strange. Very strange. I won’t go into too much detail here but it has now inspired a short story.

So as soon as we got back to Margate and stopped at Tesco, I grabbed myself a cheap notebook. Nothing fancy, just something I could jot down ideas in.

This notebook is now going to live n whatever bag I am carrying with me at the time. Because whether it’s Margate or just going out for a day trip, ideas can strike anywhere and at any time. It’s one of the first rules as a writer and one I’ve let myself down on, a lot. Always carry a notebook and pen. Always.

Lesson learnt. Because, really, you never know when you’ll see something that creeps you out enough to make you think it might just make a good horror story to creep out other people, too.

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Checking In

I’ve kind of been beating myself up over not keeping the blog more updated, but the truth is I’ve struggled recently with thinking of what I could write here that would be interesting. Then I realized, hang on, it’s my blog, I can put what I want really, and more importantly, I don’t have to do anything too lengthy.

So now and then I’ll put up shorter posts just saying what I’ve been up to and what I’m working on at the moment. Sound good? Glad we’re in agreement.

Didn’t do any writing yesterday, as I went out to watch the rugby. This is a national pastime in Wales – the Six Nations are on so it’s kind of a rule you have to go to the pub and get drunk watching a match, for at least one of the games. Importantly, yesterday was basically the decider for the whole thing. England vs Wales, an age old rivalry, so it was important on a number of levels. Wales lost. We won’t mention this again.

In terms of writing, I struggle to stick to one project at a time. A lot of my focus recently has been on short stories, though I usually dip in and out of the numerous novels I have on the go, too.

At the moment, I’m trying to get a few chapters done of my vampire novel. This is a novel I’ve worked on – on and off – since I was fourteen. I actually finished it, sent it off and had a rejection letter on it when I was fifteen. Back when I knew a lot less about writing. Obviously in the last ten years it’s gone through a lot of rewrites, especially as in that time Twilight appeared and I did not want anything linking my vampires to them. Even at fifteen, I wanted them to be darker. They’re monsters, even if the main group in the novel aren’t the bad guys. So yeah, working a little on that, which is always fun as I get to play around with a cast with massively different histories, backstories and, obviously, personalities, all through the eyes of a teenage girl who gets roped in with them while trying to look for her missing brother.

Two short stories on the go right now; one about an estate agent showing a couple around a possibly haunted house (not horror though), which I got the idea from after using Writer’s Forum plot generator square. Really useful to spark off an idea. And I’m working on the second draft of a story called ‘Indistinguishable’, about a young couple who find strange technology in a cave near their village.

Outside of writing, I’ve been working and trying to get some running in, though health issues have meant I had to stop that for a few days. I’m doing a 5K run in May, raising money for Macmillan doing it. It’s not just a straight run though; this is an inflatable obstacle course. Which should be….I hesitate to use the word fun.

And I started playing Disney Infinity on Friday. Fantastic game, I’ve got all the Star Wars sets for it now so I was playing as Boba Fett, Luke and Leia. A lot of fun. So that’s about it for now. Hope you’ve all had a great weekend and have a fun week, and I’ll try to get another post up soon.

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