September 2020 Reading Wrap Up

January / February / March Part 1 / March Part 2 / April Part 1 / April Part 2May Part 1 / May Part 2 / June / July Part 1 / July Part 2 / August

This is…super late, and I was going to skip September’s wrap up completely, but I finally have a bit more time and decided to go ahead with it anyway, because why not, really. So enjoy this rundown of the 10 books I read in September. Click on the book titles for links to my reviews.

Snake – Erica Wright

Rating: 4/5 Stars
Format: MOBI

I really liked this book. Short and to the point, Snake takes you through some really interesting facts about a fascinating animal. Wright also injects a personal aspect into the story, and if you didn’t like snakes going on, you’ll probably change your mind by the time you finish reading.

The Beast and the Bethany – Jack Meggitt-Phillips

Rating: 5/5 Stars
Format: Paperback

I read this as part of the tour for The Write Reads, and I really enjoyed it. It’s a wonderful, brilliant Children’s ‘Horror’, in a sense, and it reminded me of Roald Dahl’s work. The blog tour showed this had been really well received. With the ARC, not all illustrations were included, but even just from the ones that were, it’s easy to see this will be a fantastic Christmas present for young readers.

Phenomena: The Secret History of the U.S. Government’s Investigations into Extrasensory Perception and Psychokinesis – Annie Jacobson

Rating: 4/5 Stars
Format: Audiobook

A really interesting look at a fascinating period in US History, when the military tried to explore ways they could use ESP to give them an advantage over the USSR. Whether you believe in these sort of abilities or not, the strength in this book lies in the fact it never asks you to decide, but simply reveals information about those who did believe, and the lengths they were to to try and prove it.

Misfits – Hunter Shea

Rating: 3/5 Stars
Format: Paperback

I normally love Shea’s books, but this was a bit of a disappointment. I go into details more in the review, but I feel partly this just wasn’t for me. The writing is good as always – Shea really is talented – but a lot of aspects of this story just didn’t hit for me. Check out the review for more details.

The Ghost Tree – Christina Henry

Rating: 4/5 Stars
Format: MOBI

Horror that really hits a sweet spot. Maybe a touch simplistic in a couple of places, but overall pretty good. This isn’t YA, it’s coming of age, a subgenre that usually feels dominated by men, so it’s great to see more of a female perspective on it. Deals with family relationships, friendships, and budding romance, all while a dark supernatural threat lingers over the town. Definitely worth checking out.

Theatre at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2019

Rating: 5/5 Stars
Format: Audible

I thought I’d done a review for this one, but apparently not. Basically, this is a really solid, interesting production, putting together 5 plays performed at the Edinburgh Fringe last year. The tales told are witty, heart-warming, funny, devastating. Topics that touch on mental health, sexuality, disability, abortion, and racism, among others. For every funny moment, there’s another around the corner that’ll break your heart. They’re all brilliant, but the first – For All I Care – and the last – Typical – are the ones that truly stand out for me.

Cursed Objects: Strange but True Stories of the World’s Most Infamous Items – J.W. Ocker

Rating: 5/5 Stars
Format: MOBI

I really enjoyed this one. Cursed Objects is informative and entertaining, delving into the stories behind infamous objects. It touches on different places, too, and never really asks you to decide if these objects are cursed or not, but rather gives just the facts, showing the kind of effects these objects can have on various people’s lives, whether they are really cursed or not. Well known items crop up alongside lesser known ones. Really worth a read.

iZombie, Vol 2: uVampire – Chris Robertson

Rating: 4/5 Stars
Format: Trade Paperback

I am really enjoying this series, and luckily I now have the third one, as a birthday present from the boyfriend. After uVampire, I’m keen to see what happens next to Gwen and her friends. I mention this in the review, but if you enjoyed the TV show and haven’t yet picked these up, be warned – they are completely and utterly different. The TV show focuses purely on zombies, whereas the graphic novel has all sorts of paranormal creatures, and a lot going on.

Sacrificial Lambs and Others – Sheri White

Rating: 3/5 Stars
Format: Paperback

A little disappointed in this one. The stories are arranged in order of publication, but it does mean the first set aren’t as solid as later ones. Some of the later stories in here are great, but leading in with ones that aren’t up there means the collection starts off a little rocky. I do mention in my review, but I am excited to see what White comes out with next, and I think if the last few stories are anything to go by, White will definitely be a writer worth following.

Dracula’s Child – J.S. Barnes

Rating: 5/5 Stars
Format: MOBI

A sequel to Bram Stoker’s iconic novel, Dracula’s Child brings the gang back together, as they battle once more against the dreaded count, and must work to save the souls of their nearest and dearest. Fantastically written, with a style really fitting with the original. I absolutely loved reading this one.

So there we go. The 10 books I read in September. I should be able to get October’s wrap up posted soon, and there’s less of them than September, so it shouldn’t take too long.

One thought on “September 2020 Reading Wrap Up

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: